When are you likely to see a slow vehicle bay? When are you likely to see a slow vehicle bay?

  • A. Approaching a roundabout

  • B. On a motorway

  • C. On a hill

  • D. In the central city

  •  
    The correct answer is C
     
    Correct. Large vehicles such as trucks and buses often can't maintain their speed on a long uphill stretch of road, so passing bays are provided where there's not enough room to have a passing lane. Passing bays can sometimes be found on winding roads where there are few natural passing opportunities.
     
 
 
 

Passing lanes and slow vehicle bays

Slow vehicle bays are short stretches of road where an extra lane usually splits off to the left. Traffic moving into the slow vehicle bay should indicate left.

Passing lanes are longer stretches of road where an extra lane usually splits off to the right. Traffic overtaking in the passing lane should indicate right.

Passing lanes can be short, but they are usually at least 200m and a signpost will be given at the 200m mark advising drivers that the passing lane is ending.

What is the difference between passing and overtaking?

In New Zealand law, passing is where you move past a vehicle without entering an oncoming lane. Overtaking is where you move past a vehicle in an oncoming lane. This is different to the definition in some other countries, for example Australia.